Analyzing the dynamics of power and privilege in our classrooms, can inform the ways we structure and support cross-cultural dialogues about race.

The prospect of a Trump presidency has brought with it a rise in hate crimes and a heightened visibility for white supremacy in our country. As disturbing as this is, recent events have had at least one positive side-effect. More and more White educators are embracing conversations about race. I’ve been thinking a lot about the ways […]

I recently became the proud mother of two middle school students. We all know the transition from elementary to middle school is a big one for kids. I’m realizing this transition is a big one for families too. With that in mind, I’m taking time to write down my experience in the hope that it will help other educators and parents can better partner with one another to ensure our kids success as they embark of the fun, stressful, exciting and crazy ride that is the middle school experience.

In today’s day and age, why is it OK for SF schools to do their own thing (or NOT) when it comes to Black History Month?

I am constantly on the lookout for new ways to talk about race and identity in developmentally appropriate ways with kids. Below I’ve put together tried and true resources (Yes! I REALLY, I tried them) based on my experiences as a mom talking about race with my own kids.

BellQuote“My hope emerges from those places of struggle where I witness individuals positively transforming their lives and the world around them. Educating is a vocation rooted in hopefulness. As teachers we believe that learning is possible, that nothing can keep an open mind from seeking after knowledge and finding a way to know.”

– bell hooks

 

So we know teachers. We get teachers. We know what happens in classrooms, and we know what teachers do. We know which teachers are effective, we know which teachers left lasting impressions, we know which teachers changed our lives, and we know which teachers sucked.

We know. We know which teachers changed lives for the better. We know which teachers changed lives for the worse.

Teaching as a profession has no mystery. It has no mystique. It has no respect.” – Sarah Blaine